Isabela province is wonderfully unique. It has a signature noodle dish – Pansit Cabagan. It’s home to the world’s largest butaka (chair with long arm rests). Red bricks make up Tumauini Church.  Northern Sierra Madre Natural Park is the largest preserved jungle in the country. This is a place made for exploring.

  • Region 2

    Isabela

Isabela province is wonderfully unique. It has a signature noodle dish – Pansit Cabagan. It’s home to the world’s largest butaka (chair with long arm rests). Red bricks make up Tumauini Church.  Northern Sierra Madre Natural Park is the largest preserved jungle in the country. This is a place made for exploring.

  • Region 2

    Isabela

The raw appeal of Divilican is what draws intrepid travelers. Tucked in the wilderness of this massive province, this is no tropical island cliché. Fueled generators are the source of power. Undeveloped Dicatian Lake is a crocodile sanctuary that The Mabuwaya Organization releases young hatchlings into. But Divilican’s most remarkable gem is the Dumagats – the indigenous group of the municipality’s original settlers. The dark-skinned, curly-haired Dumagats are semi-nomadic, living off of fishing and hunting. You can meet these modest and kind people at Dicatian Mangrove Forest.

Up north of Divilican is another sleepy town – Maconacan. This is where the Dumagats are really based. You can usually catch them fishing at the Blos River (Dicatayan River).  While you’re in the area you should head to Romualdez Beach, a charming pebble beach; and Dimanoc Beach, a nestling ground for turtles.

If you’re looking for something even more off the beaten path, head to Dinapigue and visit the towering Dibulo Falls. You also might like to visit Palanan, where the first president of the Philippines, General Emilio Aguinaldo, took his last stand against American soldiers. There’s also Digoyo and Diminalno Lake, Sad-sad Falls, Kanasamuan Cave, and the white sand beaches of Dicotcotan and Didadungan.

The raw appeal of Divilican is what draws intrepid travelers. Tucked in the wilderness of this massive province, this is no tropical island cliché. Fueled generators are the source of power. Undeveloped Dicatian Lake is a crocodile sanctuary that The Mabuwaya Organization releases young hatchlings into. But Divilican’s most remarkable gem is the Dumagats – the indigenous group of the municipality’s original settlers. The dark-skinned, curly-haired Dumagats are semi-nomadic, living off of fishing and hunting. You can meet these modest and kind people at Dicatian Mangrove Forest.

Up north of Divilican is another sleepy town – Maconacan. This is where the Dumagats are really based. You can usually catch them fishing at the Blos River (Dicatayan River).  While you’re in the area you should head to Romualdez Beach, a charming pebble beach; and Dimanoc Beach, a nestling ground for turtles.

If you’re looking for something even more off the beaten path, head to Dinapigue and visit the towering Dibulo Falls. You also might like to visit Palanan, where the first president of the Philippines, General Emilio Aguinaldo, took his last stand against American soldiers. There’s also Digoyo and Diminalno Lake, Sad-sad Falls, Kanasamuan Cave, and the white sand beaches of Dicotcotan and Didadungan.